Invocation II (#CharlestonMassacre)

I am not a Christian,
and I find sentimental prayers to a God
of love and mercy
hollow.
I'd find his older incarnation
much more believable just now.
The God of righteous plagues and thorny paths,
of brimstone and furious anger,
sending vengeful, winged sword-bearers
to rain fire down.

See, that?  That I'm more inclined to believe.

I pray of thee:
Step forth and invoke him,
so the guilty and their
silent consciences
may turn to white pillars of salt,
frozen and forced, bearing eternal witness to
a legacy of ashen ruin.

Comments

  1. I've been thinking about this a lot, about God punishing these people committing crimes against humanity and I wouldn't be surprised if these people thought of themselves as greater than God, that they would actually try to argue with him that they are right and that they know more than him. If that made any sense.

    Anyway, I have a strong feeling, that I wish I didn't have, but a feeling that something worst is coming and that Charleston was just the prelude, next time it's going to take a lot more lives. I feel like we might be on the brink of another civil war. I hope I'm wrong. For now I'm just hoping the families and friends of the victims are able to get through this. I'm also waiting for the media to dig up stuff on victims to give people a reason to feel their murder was justified and how no one should feel sorry for them while simultaneously painting that piece of shit terrorist as " a depressed, troubled, youth that was bullied and misunderstood " as usual instead of the monster he is.

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  2. I hope you are wrong also. Because a lot of stupid people (both sides) will run amok. Those doomsday preppers do not seem so crazy now.

    I like the fact that some whites are willing to call it for what it is and not try to sugar coat it.

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/tv/news/jon-stewart-forgoes-jokes-in-wake-of-south-carolina-terrorist-attack/ar-AAbORwb

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  3. Having lost two brothers, (both Father and Step-Father), I’m not so removed from the pangs of grief. With my prayers going out to the aggrieved, I find this verse particularly comforting.

    “We are troubled on every side, yet not distressed; we are perplexed, but not in despair; persecuted, but not forsaken; cast down, but not destroyed.” 2 Corinthians 4:8-18

    One would be naive to presume the troubles of this world wouldn’t one day migrate to these shores. Or the fact that racial divisions (which have existed for over 400 years in this country) might one day flare up. For some, Faith is not just believing in the impossible, it means accepting the improbable. Oftentimes Faith sits just outside the restraints of logic- rationality or science. Moreover, Faith is an individual choice: one the God of heaven doesn’t force down anyone’s throat.

    The God that I believe in is not the blonde, blue-eyed Caucasoid fabricant of my oppressor, but rather: Josephus’s description of a man wanted by Pontius Pilate for claiming that he was the King of the Jews: “A man of simple appearance, mature age, dark skin, small stature, three cubits high, hunchbacked with a long face, long nose, and meeting eyebrows…with scanty hair with a parting in the middle of his head, after the manner of the Nazarites, and with an undeveloped beard.”

    Much like Islam, Christianity has been usurped to suit the ethos of a dominate culture. Besides, my troubles are trivial compared to what some have endured for their faith. The tribulations of this world being beyond my ability to comprehend or explain: but that’s where faith gives me comfort.

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