Apology Not Accepted #LeviPettit

The 10-second clip was as shocking as it was disgusting. Members of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity at the University of Oklahoma gleefully chanted the N-word in a racist song that alluded to lynching. Coming the day after President Obama marked the 50th anniversary of the bloody march from Selma to Montgomery with a powerful speech on our nation and race, the video was especially jarring.

But yesterday, one of the two expelled university students did something extraordinary. Flanked by African American leaders and clergy from Oklahoma City he met with before his nationally televised mea culpa, 20-year-old Levi Pettit apologized without equivocation and asked forgiveness with a humility far too many fail to muster.
(Source)
Needless to say, Levi Pettit is not forgiven; his apology isn't even worth the usual Toilet Paper title, yet damn near every mainstream blog and news outlet is branding him so sort of hero.  In fact, the above quote comes from a post literally titled, "Accept Levi Pettit's apology for racist fraternity chant".


Nice commanding little tone he's going on there, don't you think?  Hell, the Dallas News even has a post up entitled "Forgiving Levi Pettit is a sign of power, not weakness."  It's like the message is, "Forgive Levi Pettit...or else."

Well, allow me to retort: No.  I do not accept Levi's apology.  Levi Pettit is just another self-serving racist simply giving yet another display of his white privilege. This little show he had the luxury of putting on has nothing to do with people of color and everything to do with obtaining white absolution.

Let's go back to the basics, shall we?  White racists Do Not Care about POC  - that's the whole point.  Our thoughts and feelings are irrelevant to them; they don't even believe we can think or feel.  Their sense of superiority - however fragile - assures them they do not have to answer to anyone but one another (if even that), so you can imagine where appealing to us for forgiveness ranks.

So when Levi Pettit makes his grand little apology whilst surrounded by dutiful Negroes, the only thing on his mind is getting his life back so he continue his education and find a good job some day.  And white-run mainstream media can't kiss his ass fast enough.  Only the independent sites seem capable of keeping it real.

And speaking of the dutiful Negroes standing with Pettit in word and in person...you need to grow up.  This is not the 1960s and the old methods will not work here.  You're dealing with a new breed of racist sociopaths, and you are simply not the most qualified people to handle them.  They have adapted.  You cannot love this enemy; song and prayer will not help you overcome.

You have to adopt an entirely different attitude with these people.

Case in point.

Comments

  1. "Forgiving Levi Pettit is a sign of power, not weakness." It's like the message is, "forgive Levi Pettit... or else."

    I agree. Notice how commanding the title in the above picture is. 'Accept Levi Pettit's apology for racist fraternity chant'. In other words don't debate anything, don't discuss anything, just do it.

    It's funny how when it comes to marginalized groups dominant groups loves to go on and on about how inferior we are and how morally superior they are, yet the marginalized group is always expected to be "the bigger person".

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  2. Levi Pettit and his shitty fauxpology can pick which part of my black ass they want to kiss. Pun intended.

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  3. "It's funny how when it comes to marginalized groups dominant groups loves to go on and on about how inferior we are and how morally superior they are, yet the marginalized group is always expected to be "the bigger person"."

    I agree. Remember, that with most white men its Ideal image, verses True conduct/demeanor. Many spend a lifetime crafting an ideal representation for themselves, when privately they’re the very antitheses of that persona. The white man who calls himself Honest John your friendly neighborhood used car dealer, projects the impression that he’s trustworthy, and above reproach. The TV commercials infer, “You can trust him to be above board in his dealing with you. A good car, at a fair price.” When in actuality (and I’ve seen this so many times where I live) he’s a crook- a liar and a thief, bent on peddling worthless lemons at every opportunity.

    So it is with Levi Petti. In actuality, he’s a racist through and through- but publicly he tries to project the image of a man who’s kind, loving- caring and affable. An advocate of the oppressed, a warm and generous human being. Moreover, he's far from the racist he’s been made out to be, because that’s not who he is. Ostensibly, there can be no forgiveness without true repentance. Many of us were asked to be forgiving and accommodating to our former masters after the civil war. They were neither sorry or remorseful for raping- murdering and abusing us. Despite these facts, many of us chose to stay on as hired hands and tend to his crops in an unimaginable act of kumbaya. I liken it to a form of Stockholm Syndrome where we’ve been conditioned to Empathize/Sympathize with our oppressors. As racism trickled down the family tree and took root in subsequent generations of whites so has our pathology to forgive (and in many cases, join in league) with our oppressors at every turn. Like you said, "Always called upon to be the better person," the white man is neither held culpable or liable for his endless torts.

    What we saw on television was a stage production. A ruse- a sleight of hand where Levi Petti (the magician), allows you to see only enough to make you actually believe that a feat (Remorse) is actually happening. What he projected in front of that microphone was the guise of a man expressing attrition for his actions, while behind closed doors he’s more like, “How was it? OK? Did you believe it? There… that ought to satisfy those Blacks.”

    Don’t forgive him, don’t believe him, and most importantly- don’t trust him. The white man hasn’t been called The Devil throughout history for nothing. He’s earned that title a hundred times over. Just ask the leaders in many of the nations he currently occupies.


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    1. Remember, that with most white men its Ideal image, verses True conduct/demeanor. Many spend a lifetime crafting an ideal representation for themselves, when privately they’re the very antitheses of that persona.

      Thank you. Thank you, thank you, thank you. This is perfect. This is exactly what I'm trying to say, and in typical fashion you're saying it So. Much. Better. And that car dealership analogy was spot-on.

      White men love to write stories about great heroes and portray those great heroes, and verbally identify those heroes, but they don't actually want to be those guys. To them, the impression should be sufficient enough. Follow-through requires too much effort.

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    2. White men love to write stories about great heroes and portray those great heroes, and verbally identify those heroes, but they don't actually want to be those guys. To them, the impression should be sufficient enough. Follow-through requires too much effort.

      Exactly. The article below explains it much better than I can, but you nailed it.

      Hypocrisy as a Way of Life, By Dr. Marimba Ani

      An excerpt:
      The related distinction used traditionally in anthropology is stated in terms of "ideal culture" and "actual behavior" and is said to be characteristic of all cultures, thereby helping to confuse the issue of the uniqueness and problematical nature of European culture. The conventional distinction is illustrated in the following manner by the authors of a recently published anthropology textbook.

      For example, an idealized belief, long cherished in America, is that all doctors are selfless, friendly people who chose medicine as their profession because they felt themselves "called" to serve humanity, and who have little interest in either the money or the prestige of their position. Of course, many physicians do not measure up to this ideal. Nevertheless, the continued success of television programs that portray the average American M.D. as a paragon of virtue indicates how deeply rooted in our collective psyche the ideal of the noble physician is.

      This is a common misconception that has led to a mistaken view and superficial understanding of the nature of European (Euro- American) society. To refer to the images offered above as "ideal" is a misuse or at least a misleading use of the term "ideal." The projection and success of the image of the committed, altruistic doctor do not indicate that it is a "deeply rooted" ideal in the American psyche.

      It is rather an indication of the fact that this is how Americans want to appear to others, most often to non-European peoples-their "objects.'' In this case it is the way that the doctor wants to appear to his patients, or ''objects,'' because this appearance works to his advantage. On the other hand, an image that projects him as a potential exploiter can lead to the possibility of malpractice suits and to the institutionalization of socialized medicine-neither of which is lucrative for him.


      Like you said, it’s all about the Impression, or the Projection of Virtue to people of color. Even as he demonstrates time after time how he’s unable (And Unwilling) to live up to this image (genuinely/authentically), he endorses the rhetoric as a matter of practice through popular media- literature and world propaganda. Yes, we whites have done terrible- horrible things in the name of white supremacy, But It’s Not Who We Are. Read our history- watch our documentaries, then you’ll see how virtuous we are.

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  4. " I liken it to a form of Stockholm Syndrome where we’ve been conditioned to Empathize/Sympathize with our oppressors. As racism trickled down the family tree and took root in subsequent generations of whites so has our pathology to forgive (and in many cases, join in league) with our oppressors at every turn."

    Just like Mo'ne Davis asking that the college baseball player that got fired for sending that tweet calling her a slut be reinstated. Screw him he got what he deserved and she shouldn't feel guilty about it or anything. That was all him.

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  5. LOL....I always tell people Hitler loved his dog.....evil doesn't always look evil....it comes in a slick wrapper most of the time.....so I am sure we will see this prick doing some community service ish in some "under served" area trying to prove that is not that racist asshole we all saw in the video.....that he was raised better than that snap shot of him drunken leading a chat about Ni**ers and lynching. He deserves the chance at reclaiming his respectability...you know the chance that Michael Brown and Trayvon Martin didn't get.....

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    1. " I am sure we will see this prick doing some community service ish in some "under served" area trying to prove that is not that racist asshole..."

      No they go to a Black church ( and always get plenty of pictures or footage of it) to prove they're not racist. Community service in an "under serve" area is when they drive drunk and kill somebody.

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    2. The one thing about racism, it's more of an internal problem far more than external. The going-to-a Black-church saga is getting incredibly old. I would care how may Black churches this joker would have visited, I would never be convinced that he's a non racist. Even at 99.99 percent, that one percent will always be there. His apology doesn't mean jack to me.

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  6. Leo Princess3/28/15, 3:06 PM

    Now come on, folks. Who doesn't love seeing a bigot deliver a fauxpology while surrounded by the Negro Forgiveness Squad?

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  7. Tyler Perry often use the word " forgiveness in his movies." I think about the the picture A Diary Of A Mad Black Woman and near the end of the picture, Kimberly Elise's said that she forgives her husband,but he( the husband) misinterprets her kind words as getting back together as she reminds him that just because her inner-self was a peace , didn't mean that she wanted him back.

    I think that is what Levi and his crappy supporters think of forgiveness, that if we told him that we forgive him that we're suppose to erase what he said and that we give him permission to dog us one again..Um no! we have forgiven people like him ..over and over again yet we keep getting jacked for it. If Levi was really sorry for his actions, he would have stayed out of the fray and told his friends how wrong it was for him to do that,but no.. Levi just had a good ol'time singing his racist songs with his racist friends. I also so don't want to hear about the source of where he got that crap from. I could care less about him or his shallow " apology". He is not a baby, is a fully grown, presumably healthy grown man and was raised in a country where he knows the deal of racism that exist in this country. Would Levi stand in front of a car to get hit, eat tainted food or rob a bank because someone told him to? I bet that he's been challenged by some what if's in his dopey life and he easily rejected and I'm quite sure that if someone asked him to do these horrible acts, he would have said no. Though singing about racism will not kill him, he never had any intentions of being a man at saying this incident was wrong. He's only sorry because he was caught.

    Like Kimberly Elise's character in ADOAMBW, one can infer that the abuse that she had to endure didn't just happen overnight and it didn't stop until she put her foot down and said that enough is enough. I feel that way about Levi. Black folks can forgive you as many times as they want,but the more they do this, the more you will be laughing behind their backs saying " I got those "N"s really good". Sure, for a little bit, he'll be going..as Rose mentioned..to Black churches, schools, HBCU's..etc any thing that as a predominately Black community..telling his sob stories and telling people that he learned a valuable lesson ( Ha!) from it. Give him another year or two,he'll finish his studies at another school, have fun, get a job..who knows maybe he'll be part of the GOP or KKK ready to down Black folks again.

    The big mistake that people have about forgiveness is that they think that they can do anything to you and think they can use it against you. Far as Levi, he must understand that just because a person forgives him doesn't mean that he has permission use Blacks and other minorities as doormats. White society get angry at us because we won't bow down to his demands. He loves people who remain silent, put down others or to ignore the truth. What would have happened if we would not have responded to that tape? I promise you that they would have said nothing about it or they're typical response would have been " You deserved it.." although the truth is often out there for everybody to see.

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  8. Blame white people's warped views of forgiveness on their depraved religion. Christianity apparent allows one to do anything as long as you ask God for forgiveness on your death bed.....So (presumably) when one dies be prepared to rub elbows with slave owners, Nazis, ISIS, the terrorist douche that flew an airplane into the side of a mountain….etc…..should be interesting…..oh but depending on their view of Christianity no dogs allowed……Go figure….God’s got some quirky rules…….

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  9. Even Dr. Drew didn't believe him and he is white himself.

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    1. Use a name. And thanks for the Dr. Drew reference. His human lie detector was going off.

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    2. thanks for the link to the Dr. Drew discussion of the fake apology

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  10. Here is a podcast that Tariq Nasheed did regarding Black people being too forgiving of racists.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tvccbC_m5ok

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    1. Case in point:

      There was another high-profile apology this week. Joey Cassleberry, infielder for Bloomsburg University, made derogatory comments about 13-year-old Little League phenom Mo’ne Davis. He tweeted, “Disney is making a movie about Mo’ne Davis. What a joke. That slut got rocked by Nebraska.” The backlash was swift, culminating in Cassleberry being suspended indefinitely from the Bloomsburg University baseball team. In the midst of the furor, Cassleberry apologized via his Twitter page, then deleted the page altogether. His remarks were reflective of both a culture that oversexualizes young black girls and the consistently dismissive attitudes many have towards girls and women who excel in sports that we oftentimes associate with male athletes. His dismissal was the right call. But young Miss Davis extended an olive branch and called for forgiveness for this adult man who, despite not knowing her, decided to dismiss and disrespect her publicly with such vitriol.

      Davis told ESPN, “Everyone makes mistakes,” Davis said. “Everyone deserves a second chance. I know he didn't mean it in that type of way. I know people get tired of seeing me on TV. But sometimes you got to think about what you're doing before you do it. It hurt on my part, but he hurt even more. If it was me, I would want to take that back. I know how hard he's worked. Why not give him a second chance?”

      Many applauded Davis’ stance, and the youngster—just like the aforementioned Henson—has the right to feel however she wants and has the right to resolve this issue however she wants. But for those of us watching from the sidelines, we shouldn’t allow ourselves to become too comfortable with “classy” responses to hateful attitudes. Miss Davis accepting Cassleberry’s apology is an example of how black victims of white aggression are expected to be “the bigger person” and “take the high road.” Everyone feels better because it’s easier to write a piece praising a little black girl’s desire to forgive than it is to dissect exactly why an adult white man would behave the way this man did.

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    2. Cont'd:

      Apologies are an important part of letting go and moving forward. And that is necessary. But apologies can also become tools to silence those who are being victimized; and conversely, they can enable and endorse those who are oppressors. Some people apologize with no intention of doing the work required to make real change within themselves, and society. They apologize to absolve themselves of guilt; an act of false repentance to help them sleep at night or quiet a backlash. Levi Pettit, the now-infamous leader of the disgustingly racist SAE chant that fraternity members were caught on video singing during a bus trip earlier this month, apologized this week for his role in that shameful display of bigotry. With a small cadre of stone-faced black folks literally standing behind him, the now-expelled former University of Oklahoma student said, “There are no excuses for my behavior. I never thought of myself as a racist. I never considered it a possibility. But the bottom line is that the words said in the chant were mean, hateful, and racist.”

      “To hear the words that I am a racist or a bigot may seem logical after seeing my face and hearing me participate in a mindlessly sickening chant; however, what you and others saw in that video is not who I really am. It's not who I was raised to be and not who I think of myself to be.”

      Most racists don’t like to think of themselves as racists, just like most addicts don’t like to think of themselves as addicts. But allowing people who engage in hateful behavior to disassociate from that behavior does us harm as a culture. Forgiveness is something that is earned through time and with deeds, not over a few days and a poorly executed apology. Our focus should not be on absolving the offenders, but on rooting out the pathology in a culture that creates them. We often say that admitting when you are wrong makes you a big person. But some of these apologies aren’t admittance of anything but a desire to get back to normal. And that makes them pretty small.

      It’s great to forgive, but hatefulness shouldn’t be accepted. And neither should some apologies.
      (Source)

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    3. " Apologies are an important part of letting go and moving forward. And that is necessary. But apologies can also become tools to silence those who are being victimized; and conversely,they can enable and endorse those who are oppressors."

      BINGO! right on the money!

      With some people, they don't think they know code words or reading between the lines very well. I was just reading about Oklahoma State representative Anastasia Pittman and her being accused of being an " Aunt Thomasina " .It may seem that it's unfathomable that her critics are against her being forgiving to * cough..cough.." Levi Petit.

      Yes, in the natural, it would seem great for a person interested in wanting to making peaceful solutions to a volatile problem and it should be that way,but it's not as simple was people think it is. Similarly, to what that quote said, that was one of my concerns about this forgiveness thing. It's not so much that the people (including me) not wanting forgiving him because they want' to stay "angry"(and FTI, telling the truth is isn't getting angry as White society say )but they're pissed with Pittman because they see as a game,without her or her supporters getting the message. The part of the quote using forgiveness as cowardly way of trying to silence us is the BIG problem that they have. I was just looking at all of those response that Mrs. Pittman received . Not a lot of them came from the Black community.

      It was said that Anastasia was praised for what she did on Faux( Fox ) News. As one person said if Fox news is endorsing you, that isn't good. She should get why. They're playing her good.

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    4. Exactly. Once racists started quoting the likes of MLK and claiming POC as friends, relatives, and idols, the apology stock plummeted. It became a double-edged sword. It can be used to actually bury the hatchet, or bury an issue.

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