5.31.2014

Open Mic Night: The World We Live In

15 comments:

  1. In many ways, Elliot Rodger is also a reflection and product of the "pornographic imagination".

    One wonders if Elliot hadn’t come to the conclusion the world owed him something maybe things could have turned out differently. To summarize, it wasn’t the responsibility of others to placate his needs simply because of his racial caste. Additionally -and more importantly- no woman is ever liable because men like these lack the capacity for cognitive realization.

    Still, because of technology young boys have their pick from a wide range of digital partners. She’ll never be cross with them, and most importantly she never judges. Always submissive and ever accommodating, she sighs with beckoning eyes. That’s what Elliot and many like him have come to expect in women. An object who gives of herself unreservedly, one in whose physical characteristics correspond precisely to his specifications. Her sole aspiration is to please him as often as he wants, and just the way he likes it. So why shouldn’t women in the real world be just as obliging? From such reckoning this is the narrative those “spoiled, stuck-up blond sluts” should have aspired to. But because HIS desires have gone unfulfilled, they have brought this injustice upon themselves.

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  2. I'm still reeling in horror from the gross violations of those poor women. That image from Mardis Gras is beyond sickening.

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    1. I agree. There’s no accountability in the mob is there- only conformity. No room for self- expression or civility. The mob governs the mood of the moment, changing much like the weather. The individual is gobbled up in an instant, and soon afterward anonymity/lawlessness reigns. Collectively each participant is seduced by the thought of what might happen. For once the spark is lit a situation can quickly devolve into a feeding frenzy, with one bare breast being equal to one drop of blood (amongst sharks). These thugs turned on sisters, mothers and daughters, they were beyond rhyme or reason. Social media is full of situations like this, where people of conscience can be annulled by throngs of opportunists.

      Sadly, I don’t know what’s to become of us. As a parent I’m taken aback by the thought that these could have been my daughters, (not just in the Puerto Rican Day Parade, or the Mardis Gras event, but in those degrading music videos as well). What’s more disturbing is that this could have been my son. If we don’t raise boys to be conscionable men, moral/civil proxies whose responsibility it is to respect and defend women, then we’ve failed society as a whole.

      [For some reason my words were all-spaced-out. So I'm re-posting.]

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  3. This is no doubt a cycle that's spilled from the neighborhoods to the media and back again. Women have always been objectified and subjected to horrific misogynistic cruelty for the benefit of males. The male dominated media jumped on the bandwagon and created a multi-million dollar industry where half-naked women shaking their asses sells.

    Young men and boys see that and absorb it in their brains "This is how to treat women" repeats itself like a ticker. What's worse is that young women and girls also see that and take it in. "This is how you're supposed to act, because you were put on this Earth for men, and if not, it's YOUR fault if anything happens to you." It helps trample on the self-esteem of young girls. So, if it's not physical, it's definitely mental and emotional.

    Of course, the media will place the blame on the parents. But parents can only do so much for their children, especially those who are struggling, and some children don't have parents. And I don't see much from the media on addressing the issue, at least not the way it should be discussed.

    The media isn't entirely to blame. We see this crap everywhere in homes, in the streets, in frats houses, even in businesses and corporate settings. Like Elliot, and like M. Gibson said, there are men out there that expect women to service them, hook up with them and be grateful about it.

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  4. *heavy sigh*
    http://www.clutchmagonline.com/2014/06/woman-beaten-death-mcdonalds-refused-give-man-phone-number/

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  5. Asada:

    Couldn't even make it through the video, it makes you feel like kicking someone. Scared, actually.

    I can understand when co workers tell me they don't want to attend festivals, and look surprised when anyone asks them to go.

    There is a lot of violence that gets destroyed by our "rose colored glasses".

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  6. Notice the sheer disregard for consent. It's like I said before: too many men avoid and ignore there mere idea of consent. They act it's the worse thing in the world. They don't want a woman to have a say, because they already know there's a good chance she'll say, "No."

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  7. Oh Please! What is this buy an excuse ala Wheel of Fortune for white male villainy week! Eliot Rodger was a GROWN ASS MAN responsible for his own damn behavior! I can see why women didn't want his ugly, foolish, creepy, looked like a pre-op ass. So spare me the it's the world's fault bullshit. On top of that there are countless upon countless upon countless images of misogyny from Hollyweird, TV, magazines, graphic novels, beer commercials and even cartoons. Yet the blame almost always invariably falls on black male rappers. Interesting that you high minded negro folks never mention the defending of a rapist by rich Hollyweed white males. Or the white women that can create a career out of nothing more than enhanced lips and silicone boobs. But I'll let you continue with the selectively bash a black male tour of bullshit.

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    1. Just to be clear: this conversation is about rape culture/misogyny in general, not just Elliot Rodger and not just hip hip videos.

      But I'll let you continue with the selectively bash a black male tour of bullshit.

      You're new to commenting on this blog, so I'm going to let that slide. Make sure it's the last time you express yourself like that here.

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    2. Also don't be bashing transpeople by saying this guy looked like a pre-op. You don't need to insult transgender people while talking about how bad this guy is.

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    3. Um Lavern,

      I understand your frustration, but like Ankhesen said, this is about rape culture in general. I think the video makes that clear.

      Also, we need to face the harsh reality that rape culture has permeated into our community. It's tough to discuss it seeing as how it's one of our negative stereotypes that black men love to rape. Still, we need to confront that truth that there are indeed black men who rape and do something about it. We owe it not only to ourselves to confront and fight this problem.

      I apologize to everyone for how Lavern came off like she did.

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    4. Then why only show a hip-hop video then? why not show a trailer or scene from the thousands of Hollywood movies that glorify violence against women. Particularly horror films. I'm not absolving black men who rape believe me however there seems to be an unwritten collective among black folks that white males are off limits to criticism which IS bullshit. Many of Roman Polanski's rich, white male friends rushed to defend him while everyone including the feminists sat silent. What the hell is that but a need to protect the status quo of society in general.

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    5. It's not a hip-hop video. It's a video with some footage of rap videos, and the video itself is part of a longer documentary that, from what I've read, is about music videos and the racism, misogyny and homophobia that comes with many of them. It doesn't specifically focuses on rap or hip hop, at least in the clip. I haven't seen the documentary in its entirety.

      And again, Ankhesen isn't one of those people that "protects the status quo".Like I said in an email, I need to clear that up seeing as how you are one of my frequent authors who writes a lot of interesting and thought-provoking subjects, a writer I highly respect, and that Ankhesen Mie is a fellow blogger whom I respect and look up to. And I DO NOT want there to be any bad blood among us.

      Again, I do apologize.

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  8. Also, we need to face the harsh reality that rape culture has permeated into our community.

    It most certainly has.

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