Folklore, and Other Stories

Folklore, and Other Stories is what I call "experimental literature."  It didn't come from personal experiences.  It wasn't inspired by current events, or anything like that.  I just had to "evoke" something from the air.  I was lurking on an Asian American forum where there was a sociological discussion, of sorts, in which participants posited that Black women and Asian men in America have similar experiences.

Intrigued, I decided to test that theory.  My only question at that point was, "Can it be done?"  Can a Black woman write a story with Asian leads and come off convincingly?  And if so, what's the trick to doing so?

If you've read Folklore, you'll notice I didn't over-indulge language and culture.  I didn't feel it was the point.  The point - to me - is that Asian men are just that: men.  America has deliberately neglected this fact, just as much they've tried to neglect the fact that Black women are just that: women.

So when writing my male characters, I simply wrote them as men.  From the back cover:

"Folklore"

When young Kazuya Kurosaki orders the disposal of a rival’s favorite, beautiful Amisi Ryan shows up with a "'thank you'...from the dead". Her priceless gift, an approximately four-thousand-year-old solid gold mask, lures Kazuya into a world of myth and intoxicating fantasy, and with each telling of an ancient tale, he finds himself drawn further and further away from everything - and everyone - he knows.

"Echo"

Rory Zheng is a young traveler who arrives at Silver Wood Manor, an enchanting residence atop a mountain where he meets an array of characters. Among them are the mischievous old Irishman who designed the buildings and the chatty nine-year-old daughter of the beautiful, somber landlady of Silver Wood, whose husband is often away....

To unlock the mystery and history of the manor and its people, Rory employs some magic of his own: the art of storytelling.

"The Collection"

The divorce between Jason Rang and his filthy rich, soon-to-be ex-wife Mireille is actually going well. Or at least it does until Jason lets his new fiancée Maribel actually meet Mireille. Invited to Mireille’s newly inherited mansion (fully furnished with all manner of beautiful shirtless young men), Jason and Maribel find themselves lulled into a sensual world where they learn that sometimes - but only sometimes - an entire divorce proceeding can be just another lovers' quarrel.

The book is, unfortunately, an abridged version.  Because I published this on my own dime, I had to cut out as much as possible while leaving the tale in tact.  I'm still drafting a much longer version, which I hope to publish this winter in eBook format via Middle Child Press.  I want to do a different cover...you know, with a really hot guy looking all dark and brooding.

Folklore has some mistakes; it was published on a really tight schedule, and I paid the two English majors who edited it with beer.  Either way, I'm pretty proud of it.  It was the second book I published on my own, it garnered very positive reviews, and I've sold quite a few copies.  And it's good to know that in my own little way, I helped the Blasian cause. *nods*

Comments

  1. "black women and Asian men in America have similar experiences"

    this didn't occur to me until I started reading Racialicious

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  2. I'm intrigued. I will pick it up @ Amazon.

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  3. have already carted it. i also want your purple jars of rice when it becomes available^^
    yes i'm a fangirl *blush*

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  4. @ oshun's little girl

    If you click the "Purple Jars of Rice" link to the right, you can order it straight from my publisher's bookstore.

    Thank you so much!

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  5. no prob, you're giving me good stuff to read, which i haven't had in awhile, aside from re-reading faves. i will definitely go to that link, thanks for the info. ツ

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  6. I can't wait to check it out. :-)

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  7. This sounds exciting and really interesting. I like your writing style and I sense it's a great book.

    black women and Asian men in America have similar experiences

    I had no idea it was like this.

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  8. I had no idea it was like this.

    And until I lurked on that forum, neither did I.

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  9. This is good news because I couldn't get it last time.

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  10. @ Hateya

    Sorry about that! Didn't know what was going on!

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  11. I re-ordered from Amazon.com. They didn't send it with my other items, so I'm waiting again. If they don't send it in a reasonable time, I'll let you know. They estimate 9/20 to 10/08 for delivery. I'll let you know when they ship it.

    I'm sorry I didn't reply earlier. I wasn't subscribed to the topic and I didn't know you'd replied.

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  12. Thanks for all your support, dear. The book's gone up over 2 million spots.

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  13. @Ankhesen

    I've got a new date for October 27th and it really sucks because POC books are always "In Stock" but are never sent along with the others. This is a serious distribution problem, isn't it? I'll wait for it patiently.

    I hope the two million spots translate into two million dollars for you!!!

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  14. I.cannot.believe.it! Amazon has finally shipped your book to me. I'm quite thrilled! Yea!!! In 15 days or so, I'll be reading your published work!

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